NFL, Streaming Video and Active Archives – The Big Easy

Caringo Swarm Object Storage technology is a valuable tool for enabling workflows for sports video. You might say it's "The Big Easy."

Sports Video and Streaming
<p>LCD display screen on a High Definition TV camera.</p>

Growing up in Texas, “Friday Night Lights” are a big deal…not just a TV series. Don’t ask how, but I escaped the football frenzy and the only time I’ve attended football games was when I wanted to see the marching band. However, on a recent family vacation to New Orleans, I gained a new perspective on why NFL fans are so passionate and why Caringo Swarm Object Storage technology is a valuable tool for enabling workflows for sports video.

New Orleans Saints vs Texas Cowboys

The weekend the Saints played the undefeated Cowboys at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, it was as if all of Texas had followed me to the New Orleans Hyatt Regency (where the Dallas players were also staying). Everywhere I looked, there were Cowboy fans in blue and white with boots on and Saints fans in black and gold. As I sat on the plane back to Texas that game night, I couldn’t help but peek at the game streaming live to someone’s laptop on the aisle opposite me, and witnessed the Saints beat the Cowboys.

How is Video Valuable to Sports Organizations?

Video is quite valuable to sports organizations monetarily and also for process improvement and learning. Streaming sports games is big business, especially as more and more households are cutting the cord. The competition is heating up as streaming services continue to compete for sports fans. According to a study by eMarketer, worldwide revenues from sports digital media rights will grow by 11.5% in the next 3 to 5 years while traditional TV rights will see only 3.2% growth.

Given the intricacies of sports games, it is easy to see how an active archive of game footage for post-game analysis would be useful to the coaching staff of just about any sport—football, baseball, basketball, tennis, etc. These clips are used to illustrate the good, the bad and the ugly so teams and athletes can continue to improve their performance and game strategy.

Will Object Storage Help Me Manage My Sports Video?

Object Storage is increasingly being used not only by broadcast organizations (such as NEP Netherlands) as a platform for robust Content Distribution Networks (CDNs), but by sports teams to build their own private active archives of both practice and game footage.

Object Storage is an obvious choice as it brings a number of benefits with a small hardware footprint, scalability and cost effectiveness. And, with the release of Caringo Swarm v11, new features are available that are particularly valuable for those working with sports video files. These features include:

  • Partial File Restore, which reduces Time to Last Byte (TTLB) dramatically, so you can quickly retrieve a large video file or pull a desired clip from that file
  • Accelerated File Ingest, designed to be up to 5x faster, so you can upload any number of large, multi-GB files from any web browser
  • Simplified File Sharing, empowering authorized users to generate a streamable URL for secure internal and external file sharing using the Swarm Content Portal

accelerating-demand-access-video-archives-swarm-11

Learn More about Swarm v11

Check out the What’s New in Swarm v11 page and watch our on-demand webinar Accelerating On-Demand Access to Video Archives with Swarm 11 to learn more. If you have questions or want to schedule a demo with one of our Object Storage Experts, contact us.

Make sure you mention this blog and ask about our “buy-one-TB-get-one-TB-free” promotion with the purchase of a 3-year maintenance & support agreement through December 31, 2019.

Sarah Cook
Sarah Cook

About The Author

Sarah Cook is Caringo's Director of Marketing and brings deep expertise in Technical and Marketing Communications and Product Marketing. Sarah has worked for some of the biggest names in technology including Dell and Cisco. Sarah has a B.A. in English Composition with a minor in Music from the University of North Texas.


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